Google: Microsoft Is Cheating and Copying Our Search Results

Google set up a sting operation (!) in an attempt to catch Microsoft red-handed stealing their search results in Bing. Interestingly, Bing doesn’t deny this completely.

The whole sting operation is amazing and it started from Danny Sullivan’s post and resulting Microsoft’s response on Bing search quality.

 

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But what’s most interesting right now is that Google and Microsoft are engaged in a full-on war. They’re straight-up calling each other liars on Twitter, and their own very popular blogs!

According to official Google Blog post, it all started with tarsorrhaphy. Really. As it happens, tarsorrhaphy is a rare surgical procedure on eyelids. And in the summer of 2010, we were looking at the search results for an unusual misspelled query [torsorophy]. Google returned the correct spelling—tarsorrhaphy—along with results for the corrected query. At that time, Bing had no results for the misspelling. Later in the summer, Bing started returning our first result to their users without offering the spell correction (see screenshots below). This was very strange. How could they return our first result to their users without the correct spelling? Had they known the correct spelling, they could have returned several more relevant results for the corrected query.

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To verify its suspicions, Google set up a sting operation. For the first time in its history, Google crafted one-time code that would allow it to manually rank a page for a certain term. It then created about 100 of what it calls “synthetic” searches, queries that few people, if anyone, woimageuld ever enter into Google.

These searches returned no matches on Google or Bing — or a tiny number of poor quality matches, in a few cases — before the experiment went live. With the code enabled, Google placed a honeypot page to show up at the top of each synthetic search.

The only reason these pages appeared on Google was because Google forced them to be there. There was nothing that made them naturally relevant for these searches. If they started to appeared at Bing after Google, that would mean that Bing took Google’s bait and copied its results.

This all happened in December. When the experiment was ready, about 20 Google engineers were told to run the test queries from laptops at home, using Internet Explorer, with Suggested Sites and the Bing Toolbar both enabled. They were also told to click on the top results. They started on December 17. By December 31, some of the results started appearing on Bing.

 

Now that Google’s test is done, it will be removing the one-time code it added to allow for the honeypot pages to be planted. Google has proudly claimed over the years that it had no such ability, as proof of letting its ranking algorithm make decisions. It has no plans to keep this new ability and wants to kill it, so things are back to “normal.”

 

What do you think? Is this a cheap imitation? Is it cheating and why Google open up now?

 

[via] Search Engine Land and The Official Google Blog.